U.S. House subcommittee to investigate Tyson, other meat companies – 4029tv

GOOD AFTERNOON. I’M ALLISON WISE WITH YOUR DAILY CORONAVIRUS UPDATE. A U-S HOUSE SUBCOMMITTEE IS LAUNCHING AN INVESTIGATION INTO CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAKS AT MEATPACKING PLANTS OWNED BY TYSON FOODS AND OTHER COMPANIES. IN A PRESS RELEASE, THE U.S. HOUSE SELECT SUBCOMMITTEE ON THE CORONAVIRUS CRISIS SAYS 54-THOUSAND MEATPACKING PLANT WORKERS HAVE TESTED POSITIVE FOR THE VIRUS AND AT LEAST 270 HAVE DIED. THE SUBCOMMITTEE IS REQUESTING DOCUMENTS FROM TYSON RELATING TO THE SPREAD OF THE CORONAVIRUS AMONG ITS WORKERS. IN A STATEMENT SENT TO 40-29 NEWS, TYSON SAYS–QUOTE “OUR TOP PRIORITY WILL ALWAYS BE THE HEALTH AND SAFETY OF OUR PEOPLE, AND WE LOOK FORWARD TO WORKING WITH THE CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEE TO SHARE WHAT WE’VE DONE AND CONTINUE TO DO TO PROTECT OUR TEAM MEMBERS FROM THE CORONAVIRUS.”– UNQUOTE THE COMPANY SAYS IT HAS INVESTED MORE THAN 500 MILLION DOLLARS IN PREVENTION EFFORTS, AND THAT IT’S HIRED A CHIEF MEDICAL OFFICER TO OVERSEE EMPLOYEE HEALTH. ABOUT 59-PERCENT OF ARKANSAS’ COVID- 19 VACCINE SUPPLY HAS BEEN USED…..ACCORDING TO THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTHáá 520-THOUSAND DOSES HAVE BEEN RECEIVED IN THE STATE… OF THOSE — MORE THAN 307-THOUSAND HAVE BEEN ADMINISTERED. IN THE STATE’S MOST RECENT CORONAVIRUS UPDATE– THE ARKANSAS DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH ATTRIBUTED THIRTY MORE DEATHS TO COVID-19. ACTIVE CASES DROPPED BY MORE THAN FOUR HUNDRED. ACCORDING TO ARKANSAS HEALTH OFFICIALS, TWO MORE COVID-19 PATIENTS HAD TO BE HOSPITALIZED DUE TO THE VIRUS. AND 13 HUNDRED MORE ARKANSANS HAVE RECOVERED FROM THE CORONAVIRUS. IN OKLAHOMA, STUDENTS FROM THE FIFTH TO 12TH GRADE- ARE SET TO RETURN TO IN-PERSON LEARNING TOMORROW. THIS–AS THE OKLAHOMA STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH IS REPORTING ALMOST 14-HUNDRED NEW CASES TODAY. 17 MORE DEATHS HAVE BEEN ADDED TO THE STATE’S DEATH TOLL, WHILE áACTIVE CASES ARE DOWN BY 27

U.S. House subcommittee to investigate Tyson, other meat companies

A U.S. House subcommittee is launching an investigation into coronavirus outbreaks at meatpacking plants owned by Tyson Foods, Smithfield Foods, and JBS USA.Fifty-four-thousand workers at meatpacking plants have tested positive for coronavirus and at least 270 have died, according to a press release by the U.S. House Select Subcommittee on the coronavirus crisis.The CDC has identified meatpacking plants as a source for “rapid transmission” of the coronavirus, according to the release.The subcommittee is requesting documents from Tyson relating to the spread of the coronavirus among its workers.”In the last year, OSHA failed to issue enforceable rules, respond in a timely manner to complaints, and issue meaningful fines when a company’s unsafe practices led to the deaths of employees,” Chairman James Clyburn wrote in a letter.Clyburn’s letter to Tyson singled out specific plants: Van Buren, Arkansas, Noel, Missouri, and Storm Lake, Iowa. It also made note of an Iowa plant where Tyson managers allegedly placed bets on how many workers would become infected.”Tyson, which reported $2.15 billion in profits and “strong returns for shareholders” in Fiscal Year 2020, does not appear to have taken basic precautions to prevent these outbreaks,” Clyburn wrote.Workers and advocates have held protests and rallies in Arkansas during the pandemic, pushing for more protections against COVID-19.Tyson sent a statement to 40/29 News, saying “Our top priority will always be the health and safety of our people, and we look forward to working with the congressional committee to share what we’ve done and continue to do to protect our team members from the coronavirus.”The statement says Tyson has invested more than $500 million to add protective measures like temperature scanners, workstation dividers, and social distance monitors. It also added a Chief Medical Officer and is randomly testing employees. Tyson also closed and/or brought medical staff to some plants in the spring. Last month Tyson announced plans last month to vaccinate employees.

A U.S. House subcommittee is launching an investigation into coronavirus outbreaks at meatpacking plants owned by Tyson Foods, Smithfield Foods, and JBS USA.

Fifty-four-thousand workers at meatpacking plants have tested positive for coronavirus and at least 270 have died, according to a press release by the U.S. House Select Subcommittee on the coronavirus crisis.

The CDC has identified meatpacking plants as a source for “rapid transmission” of the coronavirus, according to the release.

The subcommittee is requesting documents from Tyson relating to the spread of the coronavirus among its workers.

“In the last year, OSHA failed to issue enforceable rules, respond in a timely manner to complaints, and issue meaningful fines when a company’s unsafe practices led to the deaths of employees,” Chairman James Clyburn wrote in a letter.

Clyburn’s letter to Tyson singled out specific plants: Van Buren, Arkansas, Noel, Missouri, and Storm Lake, Iowa. It also made note of an Iowa plant where Tyson managers allegedly placed bets on how many workers would become infected.

“Tyson, which reported $2.15 billion in profits and “strong returns for shareholders” in Fiscal Year 2020, does not appear to have taken basic precautions to prevent these outbreaks,” Clyburn wrote.

Workers and advocates have held protests and rallies in Arkansas during the pandemic, pushing for more protections against COVID-19.

Tyson sent a statement to 40/29 News, saying “Our top priority will always be the health and safety of our people, and we look forward to working with the congressional committee to share what we’ve done and continue to do to protect our team members from the coronavirus.”

The statement says Tyson has invested more than $500 million to add protective measures like temperature scanners, workstation dividers, and social distance monitors. It also added a Chief Medical Officer and is randomly testing employees.

Tyson also closed and/or brought medical staff to some plants in the spring. Last month Tyson announced plans last month to vaccinate employees.